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Artworks by Joanne Tod. Another element that characterizes her artwork – painting – portraits – is scale. Her paintings are oftentimes massive and communicate authority, while also referencing a similar spatial presence like a movie screen or billboard. Interiors, which are a recurring subject, especially institutional hallways, have been referred to as “walk in” spaces, due to the sensation of being able to step right into the frame. Technically, they are rendered to near photographic likeness, yet her measured brushstrokes remain visible, allowing realism and the artist’s hand to cohabitate. A similar kind of frisson appears in her titles, which are lyrical and poetic rather than descriptive, as if to remind us that interpretation isn’t restricted to the artist’s intention.
Another element that characterizes her artwork is scale. Her paintings are oftentimes massive and communicate authority, while also referencing a similar spatial presence like a movie screen or billboard. Interiors, which are a recurring subject, especially institutional hallways, have been referred to as “walk in” spaces, due to the sensation of being able to step right into the frame. Technically, they are rendered to near photographic likeness, yet her measured brushstrokes remain visible, allowing realism and the artist’s hand to cohabitate. A similar kind of frisson appears in her titles, which are lyrical and poetic rather than descriptive, as if to remind us that interpretation isn’t restricted to the artist’s intention.
Simultaneously, Tod continues to paint those who are part of the zeitgeist. They cover a range of popular figures, from domestic diva Martha Stewart and wrongly convicted Guy Paul Morin to young socialites of the Toronto art scene. In her most recent exhibition, Once Removed, she painted the entire lineup of the Toronto Raptors. One of her best-known projects and artworks is Oh, Canada – A Lament. Between 2007 and 2011, Tod documented Canada’s involvement in the Afghanistan mission by painting every soldier who fell during that period, using their obituary photo as a visual source. The final installation consists of 156 portraits interspersed with other painted panels arranged to resemble a fragmented Canadian flag. The project was featured in The Walrus magazine, and has been exhibited across Canada.
Until 2019, Joanne Tod taught in the Department of Visual Studies, DFALD, University of Toronto. She is a member of the Advisory Board for Sotheby’s Canada and a board member of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto. She is represented in Toronto by Nicholas Metivier Gallery.
Joanne Tod is a leading Canadian artist based in Toronto. Her paintings and artworks have been exhibited nationally and internationally for over four decades and are included in the collections of such major art institutions as the Art Gallery of Ontario, National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, and Vancouver Art Gallery.
https://torontolife.com/culture/art/toronto-artist-painted-portraits-every-raptors-player/https://www.cbc.ca/arts/how-one-raptors-game-turned-this-artist-into-a-fan-and-inspired-these-larger-than-life-portraits-1.5093544https://www.joannetod.com/soldier-project/https://www.joannetod.com/collections/